COSMIC SERPENT JEREMY NARBY PDF

The Cosmic Serpent: DNA and the Origins of Knowledge. Jeremy Narby, Author Putnam Publishing Group $ (p) ISBN Comece a ler The Cosmic Serpent no seu Kindle em menos de um minuto. Jeremy Narby, Ph.D. is the author of The Cosmic Serpent: DNA and the Origins of . Swiss-Canadian anthropologist Dr Jeremy Narby argues in his book, The Cosmic Serpent: DNA and the Origins of Knowledge, that the twin.

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Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. This adventure in science and imagination, which the Medical Tribune said might herald “a Copernican revolution for the life sciences,” leads the reader through unexplored jungles and uncharted aspects of mind to the heart of knowledge.

In a first-person narrative of scientific discovery that opens new perspectives on biology, anthropology, and the limits of rationalism, Th This adventure in science and imagination, which the Medical Tribune said might herald “a Copernican revolution for the life sciences,” leads the reader through unexplored jungles and uncharted aspects of mind to the heart of knowledge. In a first-person narrative of scientific discovery that opens new perspectives on biology, anthropology, and the limits of rationalism, The Cosmic Serpent reveals how startlingly different the world around us appears when we open our minds to it.

Paperbackpages. Published April 5th by TarcherPerigee first published To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Cosmic Serpentplease sign up. Why do people in reviews try to criticize his science when this is overall accepted as scientifically sound, even if its not a widely accepted theory? See 1 question about The Cosmic Serpent….

Lists with This Book. Feb 25, D.

This not light reading, but on the other hand it is essential reading. Narby’s premise is that hallucinogenic drugs used by shaman in the Western Amazon actually give them access to medicinal information through knowledge coded in DNA. This would be a rather bizarre premise except for the fact that Narby is a trained PhD.

His journey starts with his experience in the Western Amazon basin where he was invited to try powerful hallucinogen called “ayahuasca”. This compound, by itself is mystifying because it is made through a complex chemical process that one would not expect would be within the reach of native Amazonian chemistry. And yet, ayahuasca is used throughout the Amazon rain forest as an access to a hallucinatory world where images of spirits inform shaman how to use the hidden power of the plant life in the Amazon rain forest cure a very broad spectrum of disease.

Only in the past decades have pharmaceutical companies invade the province of these shaman to start mining for botanical compounds to patent and basically steal from the indigenous population. More than an anthropological account of how shaman use hallucination to find cures for disease, The Cosmic Serpent is a challenge to Western rationalism and modern science. Narby calls into serious question the limits of the scientific process and how we come to know things int he industrialized world.

His argument is actually quite convincing as he punches holes in rational constructive thinking and makes the case for completely different and more intuitive platform of knowledge.

While many in the scientific world have scoffed at his theories, Jeremy Narby has succeeded at least in throwing a monkey wrench in the the more-myth-than-truth paradigm of science and has opened the door for inquiry into what may prove to be the future of human knowledge. I’m not sure if this is one of those cases of, “When you have a hammer, everything looks like a nail,” or something entirely different, but either this guy is really onto something here, or he’s a complete and utter banana sandwich.

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For the first half of the book, I was strongly in the former camp.

The Cosmic Serpent: DNA and the Origins of Knowledge by Jeremy Narby

For the second half, I began to slowly drown in the latter. This is the first audiobook where I want to keep a review short because I don’t want to post spoilers. I also want to keep it short because I’m not entirely sure what to say. DNA is an actual vector through the electromagnetic fields of which human beings and other animals receive instructions about how to interact with their world.

I mean, read it. But make sure you’ve got your tinfoil hat ready. View all 3 comments. For anyone interested in DNA, shamanism and the origins of life and knowledge, this book is a must-read.

The author attempts to establish connections between modern science’s biomolecular understanding of DNA and the knowledge imparted on shaman by their ayahuasca-induced hallucinations.

Open your mind and read on. You won’t be disappointed. Aug 21, Jonathanstray Stray rated it did not like it. This book is an astonishing example of delusional thinking and exceptionally insane reasoning. View all 4 comments. Oct 30, Jenny rated it liked it Shelves: Let’s start with what I liked.

Jeremy Narby The Cosmic Serpent — DOP

I like how Narby takes a deconstructionist approach to anthropology. I like how he fearlessly points out the cultural biases and confirmation bias of the scientific method. I love Narby’s cross-cultural, interdisciplinary, “big picture” approach.

I like how he tries to find evidentiary support for all of his claims. I like that he wrote for a regular, non-academic audience.

I like that he framed his theory in the context of a story. As you can see, there are a lot of Let’s start with what I liked. As you can see, there are a lot of positive things about this book! Now, for what I didn’t care for: While in this hallucinogenic state, a person can communicate with their own DNA through images and music. Serpenf, he claims that DNA itself is conscious and can talk to the DNA in any other life form through light waves, so when you establish contact esrpent your own DNA, you also have access to all the knowledge in all the DNA in the world.

This explains the advanced botanical knowledge of indigenous coemic, as well as the extremely common mythological imagery across the world of a divine creator represented by a “twinned snake” the double helix structure of the DNA molecule. Also, DNA is from space and is consciously controlling the course of evolution. I’ve been intrigued by shamanism and the religious experiences associated with hallucinogens for years; I think there’s a lot there that nadby don’t serpenh.

The combination of spirituality and science feels like it’s on the right track to me, and I’ve always liked the idea of SOMETHING that connects all the living creatures on the planet let’s call it the over-soul, to borrow a term from Emersoneven if I’ve never actually felt such serpenh connection myself.

That being said, I just.

Serpent’s tale

Each successive chapter makes a wilder claim, and as they say, extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. I don’t think Jerem provides anywhere near enough evidence to support his theory though to be fair, he makes a valiant effort and does serpeny support his ideas better than I expected him to.

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Still, it was definitely an interesting read. I can think of several people I know who would eat this up, so to them, I say go for it. Dec 03, Walter rated it did not like it Recommends it for: This was a slightly crazy book by an anthropologist who has taken too many hallucinogenic “ayahuasca journeys”.

He has a thesis that ayahuasca allows shamans to communicate with nature via DNA. He proposes that DNA crystals in cells can receive information from biophotonic emissions and that all life is interacting in this way.

I could have entertained his ideas if he presented them differently. He was very antagonistic to Western science, but still attempted to take advantage of it’s legitimacy This was a slightly crazy book by an anthropologist who has taken too many hallucinogenic “ayahuasca journeys”. He was very antagonistic to Western science, but still attempted to take advantage of it’s legitimacy to prop up his theories about nature.

I was very annoyed by this book.

serpnt View all 12 comments. Jan 19, Emily rated it liked it. This is the story of an excellent thought experiment, and for this reason I have learned much. However, as a geneticist researcher myself, I have to say that Narby is an excellent anthropologist but a dirt poor biologist.

His hypothesis is falsifiable and is therefore “scientific” but it is a poor hypothesis rooted in metaphor. I realize this was published two decades ago and the study of biology doesn’t stand still, so evidence used by Narby e. In addition, the falsifiability of evolution has been satisfactorily addressed by numerous scientists and philosophers and it is indeed a “theory” in the classic sense. My disappointment isn’t that his hypothesis is so unexpected which can be great!

Biophotons from DNA ser;ent somehow communicate agricultural information to people while they’re under the influence of hallucinogens?? This is pseudoscience and provides no clsmic to support that this is how biophotons work. As an aside, biophotons appear to be released from the lipid membrane, which is the main area of cell-cell communication via visible light– not DNA.

I think zaney unexpected ideas in science are fascinating and can lead to unexpected breakthroughs and major paradigm shifts. In such instances, the burden of proof will always be on the hypothesizer. And, as somebody coming from within the field, I felt like his arguments were extremely weak and reflective of his poor knowledge of biology, which he himself admits to jeermy in the book.

In fact, he’s guilty of the same “cowboy science” he criticizes. Anyways, still worth a read though. It’s always a valuable reminder to pause, take a step back, and refocus. Aug 15, Laura rated it it was amazing.

This was a winner. Exactly the right balance between scholarship and accessibility. Almost half the book is made up of end notes and xerpent, and Dr. Narby is brave, cautious, and eloquent stating harby thesis: Since he’s a vetted scientist, this is no easy claim to make. Cozmic does he rely except but for a fraction of the book on his own experience with Ayahuasca, which is very limited, and one of the few things that I would have like This was a winner.